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Gatorade Boy who learned to fly – Usain Bolt

Gatorade is running “The Boy who learned to fly”, an animated short film exploring the life of Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt in anticipation of the 2016 Rio Olympics. The 7:10 minute film begins with a young Bolt running through the streets of Trelawny, Jamaica in efforts to arrive at school in time. He’s discovered by his track and field coach when he races an older student in an effort to win his lunch. Usain’s early success as a boy was overshadowed by fear of losing. His mother’s encouragement to “keep it light” and let his joyful personality shine through helped Bolt overcome his fears. He overcomes his fears and the pressures of performance to ultimately become the fastest man in the world.

Gatorade Boy who learned to fly - Usain Bolt

Samsung Olympics Anthem

Samsung has launched “The Anthem”, an inspiring Rio Olympics commercial combining segments of national anthems from several countries to form one anthem brought to life by athletes and fans across the globe. The Samsung Olympics Anthem opens with a young girl from Australia singing a line of “Fatshe leno la rona”, the Botswana national anthem, into a Samsung Galaxy S7edge. Throughout the ad, the Samsung Galaxy smartphone travels to all corners of the world, capturing and sharing the voices of fans and athletes around the globe as they sing lines from other national anthems. Each line follows seamlessly to form a brand new anthem, giving viewers a glimpse of how Samsung innovative mobile products and technologies can help to break down geographic barriers and unite the world through deep, borderless connections.

Samsung Olympics Anthem - Rio

Air New Zealand Safety in Hollywood

Air New Zealand’s latest in-flight safety video, Safety in Hollywood, stars Anna Faris (Christy Plunkett in Mom) and Rhys Darby (Murray Hewitt in Flight of the Conchords). The five-minute Air New Zealand Safety in Hollywood film is set in multiple iconic Hollywood film locations at Warner Brothers Studios, including those used in Jurassic Park, Casablanca, War of the Worlds and True Blood. Rhys presents Anna with a script featuring Anna, himself, two Air New Zealand flight attendants, and over 20 extras, including Chester the Chihuahua, who has appeared in Transformers and Grey’s Anatomy. They move from Police Academy, romance in Paris, horror in the woods, and a Western-style show down.

Air New Zealand Safety in Hollywood

TAC Meet Graham the Invulnerable

The Transport Accident Commission (TAC), a road safety organisation in Victoria, Australia, has launched ‘Graham’, an interactive lifelike sculpture demonstrating human vulnerability. Royal Melbourne Hospital trauma surgeon Christian Kenfield and Monash University Accident Research Centre crash investigator David Logan briefed Melbourne sculptor Patricia Piccinini to develop Graham. Graham has been designed with bodily features that might be present in humans if they had evolved to withstand the forces involved in crashes. Studies have shown that the human body can only cope with impacts at speeds people can reach on their own, unassisted by vehicles. The TAC Meet Graham installation is on show at the State Library of Victoria until August 8, before going on a roadshow. The public can also interact with Graham online at www.meetgraham.com.au. Google Tango, the latest in immersive augmented reality technology, is used to take viewers beneath Graham’s skin and better understand how his unique features would work to cushion him from serious injury in a crash. School curriculum has also been developed to enhance the learning experience for students visiting Graham in person or online.

TAC Meet Graham

Heathrow First Flight marks 70 Years

Heathrow Airport is running its first ever television advertising campaign, celebrating 70 years of flight. Heathrow First Flight, set to David Bowie’s 1967 track “When I Live My Dream”, follows a five-year-old girl, Harriet, and her companion Owly. Together they travel from her home, through the airport and onto a flight. The advert ends with the line ‘To the next 70 years of first flights’.

Harriet in Heathrow First Flight commercial