UPS Driver For A Day

UPS is running “UPS Driver For A Day”, a television commercial connected with the Wishes Delivered advertising campaign. Carson, a 4-year old boy living in Colorado Springs, befriended Mr. Ernie, his neighborhood’s UPS driver, when he started delivering a special formulation of milk to Carson’s door three times a week. As part of the shipping company’s Your Wishes Delivered campaign, Carson wanted to be a UPS driver for the day. So UPS made him one, with his own Power Wheels truck, brown uniform, packages and even signature pad. The Wishes Delivered campaign, online at wishesdelivered.ups.com, also includes commercials “Your Wishes Delivered”, “Let It Snow”, and “Books To Malawi”.

UPS Driver for A Day

UPS Driver for A Day

UPS Wishes Delivered site

“Every delivery UPS makes starts with a wish. Because we enjoy helping others deliver those wishes, we’re extending our commitment. This season, for every wish you share, we’ll donate $1 to charity.”

“On Christmas morning in 2004, Southern Texas woke up to 5.2 inches of snow. Ten years later, folks had been wishing the local children could relive the magic of that day. So UPS delivered a snow day along with hats, gloves and scarfs to Corpus Christi.”

“Mary Singletary, President of the U.S. National Council of Women, knows that one book has the power to change a multitude of lives. Her wish was to deliver schoolbooks to children in Malawi. She worked with UPS to equip these children with thousands of books—powerful tools to help change their lives for the better.”

Credits

The UPS Driver For A Day ad was developed at Ogilvy & Mather, New York, by chief creative officer Alfonso Marian, group creative officer Eric Wegerbauer, associate creative director Mike Cicale, senior copywriter Ingrid Hanson, copywriter Jenny Wagstaff, senior content producer Alicia Zuluaga, project management director Mae Flordeliza, account supervisor Micardo Celicourt and global engagement leader Jethro Ferguson.

Filming was shot by director Theresa Wingert via Fiona, New York, with executive producer Alex Carone.

Editor was Kim Dubé at Lost Planet.

Music was produced at Pull, New York.