Toyota RAV4 Some things in life can wait

Toyota Australia’s latest RAV4 ad campaign challenges the preconception (if you’ll excuse the pun) that young couples buy an SUV only when they are about to start a family. The ads, released this week, make it clear that the main reasons for a young couple purchasing a RAV4 are its fun, performance and lifestyle. A series of commercials shows hopeful “grandparents-to-be” holding pink booties and painting a nursery, mistakenly believing that the young couple’s purchase of “a sensible SUV” is “a sign” of an imminent baby announcement. Instead, the young couple enjoys their RAV4, driving and listening to their music as well as playing beach cricket and buying fast food with their friends. Their attitude is summarised by the tagline “Some things in life can wait.”

Toyota Rav4 Future Grandparents


Toyota Australia divisional manager national marketing Scott Thompson said RAV4 buyers have an energetic lifestyle and have a passion for the outdoors. “The Toyota RAV4 is engineered for adventure, delivering the practicality demanded by owners – whether they’re cruising the highways or roughing it off the beaten track,” Mr Thompson said. “Buying a RAV4 reflects an attitude – that you’ll do what you want when you’re good and ready. Of course, if and when a couple eventually decides to have children, the RAV4 has plenty of space for the expanding family and all their gear.”

The campaign is supported with an extensive print, outdoor and online schedule.

Click on the image below to play the Booties video in YouTube (HD)

Click on the image below to play the Nursery video in YouTube (HD)

Credits

The campaign was developed at Saatchi & Saatchi Australia, Sydney, by creative director Steve Carlin, copywriter/art director Jon Burden, art director Nils Eberhardt, senior copywriter Steve May, group business director Ben Court, senior business director Amy Turnbull, and agency producer Kia McEvoy.

Filming was shot by director Tim Bullock via Prodigy Films with producer Marge McInnes.

Media was handled by TMS.