Heineken This Is the Game

Heineken is celebrating its sponsorship of the Rugby World Cup, being held in New Zealand, September 9 to October 23, 2011, with “This is the Game”, a television commercial focusing on the code handed down from warriors of old. “Yes we wear dresses and yes we dance but this will never be drama class. We will respect a man’s anthem even he murders it. Never question the bounce. Who knows where this odd ball will go. Listen to the whistle man no matter how much he blows. Sleep when we are dead…” The 60 second “This is the Game” ad is supported by 10 second commercials ideal for play during the games, and an iPhone app “Kick Live Goals”.

Heineken This Is The Game


Click on the image below to play the This Is The Game video in YouTube (HD)

Heineken Kick Live Goals app

Click on the image below to play the Bounce video in YouTube (HD)

Click on the image below to play the Heaven video in YouTube (HD)

Click on the image below to play the Peace video in YouTube (HD)

Click on the image below to play the Anthem video in YouTube (HD)

Click on the image below to play the Scotsman video in YouTube (HD)

Click on the image below to play the Dresses video in YouTube (HD)

Credits

This is the Game was developed at Wieden+Kennedy Amsterdam by executive creative directors Eric Quennoy and Mark Bernath, copywriter David Smith, art director Craig WIlliams, and agency producer Cat Reynolds.

Filming was shot by director Steve Rogers via Revolver, Sydney, and Cherokee Films, Auckland, with director of photography Geoffrey Simpson, producers Katie Smith and Ian Iveson, executive producer Michael Ritchie.

Post production was done at Glassworks, Amsterdam. Editor was Bernard Garry at The Editors.

Music is “A Soldier’s Chorus”, from Gounod’s Faust, produced at Extreme Music, Berlin.

Heineken Rugby World Cup supporters

  • http://www.theinspirationroom.com Duncan

    Unfortunately for Heineken, the main commercial shows a black and white clip of a rugby league side (Batley), led by captain Wilf Auty, heading out on to the field against Salford on November 2, 1901, a scene captured by early British cinematographers Mitchell and Kenyon. Heineken have admitted their mistake and have pledged to fix it, asking Wieden and Kennedy to re-check the footage.