BBC Nature What a Wonderful World

RKCR/Y&R has created a two minute tribute to the nature documentary work of David Attenborough, aired at the end of the Frozen Planet series on BBC on December 7. The agency had the challenge of creating a trail that explicitly showcases the phenomenal content the BBC has brought, and will continue to bring, the nation and to implicitly pay homage to the legend that is Sir David Attenborough. Attenborough, who turned 85 in 2011, provides a spoken version of “What a Wonderful World”, the track popularised by Louis Armstrong in 1968, over carefully selected images from nature documentaries.

David Attenborough


Click on the image below to play the What A Wonderful World video in YouTube (HD)

The BBC’s Youtube version, along with the Youtube channel and videos are not available in many places outside the UK.

Credits

The What A Wonderful World clip was developed at RKCR/Y&R, London, by executive creative director Mark Roalfe, creatives Ted Heath and Paul Angus, business directors Jo Bacon, Holly Smith, and account director Josh Harris.

“What a Wonderful World” was written by Bob Thiele (as George Douglas) and George David Weiss.

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  • heather ramsay

    No one can deny the beauty of our astonishing David Attenborough reciting the lyrics of one of the most wonderful songs of praise for our universe; however, why the awful choral background music with gospelly female? This is appalling. The background to our David should be Whales, Dolphins, Great Northern Divers and Nightingales. Did no one think of this? The man and the song should be respected with the wild sounds which he is praising, not the contrived, horrid, fashionable irrelevance of the gospel choral twang.

  • heather ramsay

    Please… all you wonderful sound engineers..record producers..make a soundtrack which does his rendition proud…it’s a gift for a creative ear. Whoever let that awful background choral nonsense surround David Attenborough’s beautiful voice is nuts. If you must have a human voice, have one which reacts with the wild, calling as the mammals we are; Innuit, Masai, Indonesian female bird callers, whatever. The point of the rendition is that it is raw praise for the totality of the planet: rehearsed choral nonsense as an accompaniment simply degrades the whole.

  • heather ramsay

    Please BBC sound guys…please…honour this otherwise beautiful soundtrack with a much better creative backing…the sounds of fauna reverberating across the planet with an orchestration we rarely appreciate. The only human voice should be David’s, unless it is a wild unrehearsed one.