Toyota Camry Every Bit Brilliant

Toyota is repositioning the Camry in Australia with an integrated advertising campaign featuring the inspiration and dedication behind the model. The main television commercial, launched on Saturday August 23, features a thoughtful engineer who walks around the Toyota design facility thinking, designing and planning. Throughout the building each engineer has a contraption floating about his or her head. But he must work on his idea before it comes a reality in practice. A series of 15 second TV ads focuses on particular features of the Camry. Interestingly enough the ads do not feature the standard jump at the end. However Toyota has also launched a slow motion advertisement dedicated entirely to an exploration of that legendary jump.

Engineer looks as whiteboard in Camry television commercial


Click on the image below to play the video in YouTube

The web site features all the TV ads, along with four videos in which technicians explain advances relating to performance (electronically controlled transmission), safety (vehicle stability control), technology (rain sensing wipers) and comfort (dual zone climate control).

Screen shot from Toyota Camry site

Credits

Marketing staff from Toyota Motor Corporation Australiat included Peter Webster, Scott Thompson, Loretta Law, Hannah Roy and Lisa Sutherland.

Toyota’s Corporate Manager for National Advertising Scott Thompson said the intent behind the campaign is to get people to re-evaluate the Camry and see the strength in all of the thinking that’s gone into it: “We really felt we needed to find a new way to talk about Camry, and another ad full of cars shots and meandering voice overs just wasn’t going to reframe the conversation. The idea of ‘Every Bit Brilliant’ and Mojo’s execution of it, we believe sets us on the right path. It’s not like other car advertising and at the same time it just feels so right for our brand.”

The Every Bit As Brilliant campaign was developed at Publicis Mojo Australia by creative director Micah Walker, art director Paul Sharp, copywriters Jon Rosen and Mike Burdick, account managers Amanda Wheeler, Sara McConkey, Katrina Borghetti, strategic planner Ian Cassidy and agency producer Sacha Loverich.

Filming was shot by Nick Gordon via Academy Films, London, with director of photography Olivier Cariou and producers Sally Campbell and Laura Kanerick.

Line production was done at GoodOil Films, Sydney. Post production was done at Fuel VFX, Sydney.

Music is by Pete Raeburn & Nick Foster at Soundtree Music, London.

Photographer for the print campaign was Greg White, London.

Toyota Camry Whiteboard

  • Myles

    Who is the composer of the music used in the Camry TV commercial?
    Cheers

  • Sacha

    Hi Guys,

    Music: Sound Tree Music, London http://www.soundtree.co.uk
    Composers: Pete Raeburn & Nick Foster

    Cheers,
    Sacha

  • Jeff

    Why is this TVC so bad? When will toyota go back to making great ads. They have not made one for years.

  • Ian Mack

    At last, the world’s very worst TV car advert. Most car ads these days are just tedious showing off by ‘imaginative’ time and money wasters. There’s the bloke whizzing through the air, the meaningless car chase of ‘Daniel’s Birthday’, the guy training his alligator! For crying out loud!

    But the Camry Ad is even dafter. It has people wandering about with silly things dangling over their heads. Its just laughable except for the usual, annoying minimalist music popular with advertising twits these days.

    ‘Every bit brilliant’ tells the whole story. The Ad guys and Toyota could have saved millions with a five second ad SHOWING THE CAR and the tag line on top. Simple. Unpretentious. Joy.

  • Ian Mack

    I was clearly wrong! The new 2010 Ad for the Hybrid Camry is even more farcical.

    Nearly every politician in Australia was hired for the Ad.

    Where else could the agency have found hundreds of people able to perform backflips as the new vehicle moved around.

    Silly nonsense. Garish glitter. No info about the car.

  • Gustavo Rezende

    Hello. The question that I have is, who was the target audience when this car was made?