RSPCA a Hit in Australia

The RSPCA in Australia is challenging the public perception of a fluffy organisation that deals with kittens and dogs. Every day the RSPCA through a range of programs and services help people in emotional and physical danger. The objective of this campaign was to shift this perception and talk to a new, broader audience.

RSPCA Domestic Violence ad


Hit

In this ad a woman is bashed by her male partner. Eerily, what we hear is the whimpering of a protesting dog.

Click on the image below to play the video in YouTube

Lick

A woman affectionately plays with her dog. As the ad progresses we see bruises appear on her arms and face.

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Raid

When the police raid a house, who do you think it is that subdues the guard dogs?

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Credits

The RSPCA abuse campaign was developed at The Campaign Palace Sydney, by executive creative director Paul Fishlock, art director Andrew Town, senior copywriter Laurie Ingram, head of broadcast Meredyth Judd and account team David Hartmann, Zoe Hayes, Nicky Nole, agency producers Jacqui Gillies and Kaija Wall.

Filming for Hit was shot by Glendyn Ivin via Exit Films, with director of photography Adam Arkapaw and producer Jane Liscombe.

Filming for Lick was shot by director Ben Lawrence via Caravan Pictures, with director of photography Anna Howard, editor Philip Horne, producer Emma Lawrence.

Sound was designed by Simon Kane at Nylon Studios. Editor was Jon Holmes at Tide Edit. Post production was done at Complete Post.

Says the creative team: “When we discovered that 57% of domestic abuse victims delay leaving home fearing that harm could come to their pets and that the RSPCA had a program to deal with this problem, it was a difficult story we had to tell. The idea itself was hard hitting and a sensitive touch was required. Glendyn was a natural choice as director and Simon’s sound design is exceptional. Together they produced a piece of film that was both disturbing without being gratuitous.”