Wake up for JC Penney Sale

JC Penney promoted (or not as the case may be) the post-thanksgiving sale this year with a somewhat disturbing TV advertisement in which a mother wakes up her two daughters at 4 am. Photography, lighting and music combine to produce a sense of menace which is almost resolved as we discover the family is joining the rush to the local JC Penney store.

Wake Up for JC Penney Sale


It’s been revealed that JC Penney did not approve this commercial for broadcast. Online copies of the video have been removed.

Credits

The Wake Up ad was developed at Saatchi & Saatchi New York by chief creative officer Tony Granger, creative director Kerry Keenan, art director Menno Kluin and Michael Schachtner, copywriter Julia Neumann and agency producer Zamile Vilakazi.

Filming was shot by director Mike Long via Epoch Films, with director of photography Stephen Blackman and producer Pat Harris.

Editor was Joe Guest at Final Cut, New York, with assistant editor Jamaal Parham and producer Lauren Shawe. Post production was done at The Mill, New York, by colorist Fergus McCall, senior Flame artist Marc Goldfine, Flame artists Greg Cutler, Brian Benson, designers/animators Bowe King and Michael Schaeffer.

Online editing was done at Charlex, New York by senior creative director Richard Eng, executive producer Adam Isidore and producer Chris Volckmann.

Sound was designed and mixed by Teressa Tate. Music was composed by Mario Grigorov and Spencer Corbin at Siblings, New York, with producer Ryan Fitch.

  • deadthevideo

    I have never seen this ad, but from what I have read here, it doesn’t seem like the sort of ad that would be popular. The idea of a mother sneaking into her children’s bedroom and telling them to wake up because there is a sale on is very out of place for a clothing store chain. This is the sort of approach that is more associated with upfront child abuse adverts. Should a clothing store be doing this? I don’t think so. Agencies set up to protect our children would quite likely try to get this ad off the air, and they would be justified – it simply sounds too menacing.