Snickers for Sword and King

A Snickers campaign developed in Canada last year developed a medieval market for the chocolate and peanut bar. A Snickers snacking man suggests to rioters and soldiers that their battles and beheading would be unnecessary if they just had a Snickers bar. The two TV ads were shot in Budapest, Hungary with one Canadian lead actor and a cast of up to 250 Hungarian extras wearing costumes from the movie, Gladiator.

Snickers man stands in the middle of two opposing armies


Sword

Two hordes of sixteenth century soldiers thunder down opposite slopes towards each other, destruction clearly on their minds. They’re stopped by the appearance of a young man, played by Nicolas Rose, standing in the middle of the valley, eating a Snickers bar. “OK. OK. Just… throwing this out there… but… is this really about who gets the magic sword? Or is everyone just a little on edge because they’re hungry? Gunther?” He points to his Snickers machine. Click on the image below to play the Sword video in YouTube

King

A crowd of serfs chants “Kill the king! Kill the king!” as their ruler is led to his place of execution. There to meet them is a man from the 21st century. Nicolas Rose’s character once again intervenes: “Alright. Is this really about Eddie here using all your tax money to build a hot tub or is everyone just feeling a little down because they’re hungry?” He points to the Snickers dispenser. Click on the image below to play the King video in YouTube

Credits

The Snickers “Hungry” campaign was developed at BBDO, Toronto, by chief creative officer Jack Neary, associate creative director/copywriter Patrick Scisson, associate creative director/art director Mark Mason, account directors Natalya Lukie and Scott Griffith, and agency producer Sam Benson.

Filming was directed by Charley Stadler via Spy Films, Toronto, with executive producer Carlo Trulli, production designer Tom Still and director of photography Fraser Taggart. Stadler is known for his 2004 feature film, “Dead Fish’ starring Gary Oldman, Robert Carlysle and Terence Stamp.

Local production services were provided through Strawberry Films, Budapest headed up by executive producer Katalin Krammer.

Editing was done by David Baxter at Panic & Bob, Toronto.

Postproduction at Notch, Toronto was done by colorist Billy Ferwerda.

Snickers man intervenes in a sixteenth century execution

Special effects were done by Steven Lewis at Spin, Toronto.

Sound and music team at The Eggplant, Toronto, included composer Steve D’Angelo, sound designer Rocco Gagliese, and audio post mixer Nathan Handy.

Sixteenth century soldiers head to the Snickers machine